Sex may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think climate change. But the collared flycatcher, both appear to be related to the underlying order some.

As the temperature rises, flycatchers man’s forehead bright white spots’ worth of signal sexual responsibility.

Since 1980, Lars Gustafsson environment Uppsala University in Sweden during collared flycatchers people of the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. Every year, he and his score of each bird numbered leg bands, can the family, reproductive success and survival of many generations of birds that can be detected.

In recent years, reports of test tape at Gustafsson down. A staff member Simon Evans wondered if the change was only a reaction to a bird or conditions change all the small building.

Evans then combed through 34 years of records. He discovered that the bird had a large forehead spots most likely to contribute genes to the next generation of small lobes and neighbors, but has the disadvantage that the second half of the court. Further analysis showed that these changes are related to the high temperatures in the spring, as a result of climate change.

strange bird with a broad forehead grow worse in the heat, not because they have small children, but, because they are less likely to survive the coming winter.

Evans, now at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, is no more, because it is so. But he speculated that the man with a broad forehead to bear some of the cost of display, probably with a lot of competition and fight against others. the hot springs somehow increase this value. “The features were developed because of climate change,” said Evans.

sudden changes in the mating signal could be a warning that the flycatcher role in the process of changing, Cody said Dey, biologist at the University of Windsor preservation, Canada. “Changes to the makeup sex may indicate that there are changes in the ecological.”

changes of gold and other types of signs may, Dey think.

Cosmetic Some completely may disappear, while others, new construction, and climate change can lead to a successful and who is losing in a beauty contest in the world, write Dey and his friend James Dale at University Massey in Palmerston North, New Zealand , in an article in Nature in Ecology & Evolution.

Evans was only able to identify reversal collar flycatcher because Gustafsson unusual set of data – further evidence of the value of long-term ecological research, said Dey.